Daucleddau.

Western Cleddau

The rivers of Pembrokeshire

The county is divided by the double arms of the Cleddau and the Carew and Cresswell rivers – meaning two swords the Cleddau  and its banks are one of Pembrokeshire’s best kept secrets.

With steeply wooded banks and many inlets and creeks, known as pills, the river provides tranquil shelter for an abundance of wildlife. Mammals thrive in the deciduous woodlands and wildfowl include goldeneye, merganser, curlew, shelduck, cormorants, herons, kingfishers : in winter there is food for waders and waterfowl.

So little known, this has been called The Secret Waterway and the many tiny villages cling to the inlets and shores  – to name just a few, Lawrenny, Burton, Cresswell Quay and Cosherton each have a uniqueness and appeal. Once there were many shipbuilding yards and plenty of trading – the rotten remains of wooden trading barges can be seen. In the 19th century lots of trade took place on brigantines, ketches, sloops, schooners, coasters and large flat barges called Willy Boys – coal, culm, grain, limestone, timber, coal were common goods. The women of Llangwm used to walk miles to markets across the county to sell fish.

Coal was also a mainstay of employment, particularly around Hook. In 1845 40 men and boys were drowned when the Garden Pit at Landshipping flooded. Once famed for oysters, Lawrenny is now a busy quay and yachtclub with a popular seasonal restaurant and woodland walks around the banks.

 

 

In 1970  the Cleddau bridge was built spanning the river above Neyland, reducing the meandering drive from different parts of this river  to the other side and easing access to the more remote parts of south Pembrokeshire.

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Suzanne Ashworth

Suzanne Ashworth

Suzanne is now enjoying realising her long-held ambition to work as a Community Photojournalist and to celebrate her passion for the beautiful county of Pembrokeshire. Usually accompanied by her Pembrokeshire border collie, Cwtch.

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